Herbs for anxiety in 2023 – is it effective ?

Every year, over 18% of individuals in the USA suffer from anxiety disorders, Treatment options for anxiety disorders have expanded over time to include both prescribed medications and natural alternatives.(Source)

Several herbal supplements, according to research, may be beneficial for disorders such as anxiety, depression, and others.

In this article, we’ll look at some of the most common research-backed anxiety herbs, as well as other possible treatments to think about.

 Herbs for anxiety

Herbs can have a variety of benefits for anxiety, including reducing symptoms such as stress, tension, and nervousness. Some commonly used herbs for anxiety include passionflower, kava, and valerian root. These herbs can help to relax the body and mind, improve sleep, and promote a sense of calm.

However, it’s important to note that the use of herbs should be discussed with a healthcare professional, as they can interact with other medications and may have side effects. Additionally, herbal supplements are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and may contain contaminants or inconsistent levels of active ingredients.

There are plenty of herbs for anxiety which will aid an individual with anxiety. Some of the most common herbs include Valerian, Ginseng, Catnip, Chamomile, Lavenders and also Damiana. There are actually a lot of herbs for anxiety. Only the herbs that are more common will be highlighted.

Valerian

Herbs for anxiety Valerian

is a fast acting herb which will help if used within the first hour of usage. This is also a remarkable sedative. Although, this herb has no true toxic side effects, nonetheless, if this is in large dosage, this is known to have some negative effects.  The side effects of Valerian if this will work best as a tranquilizer will include drowsiness or dizziness.

sleep-related disorders. It is believed to work by increasing the levels of a neurotransmitter called GABA in the brain, which helps to reduce feelings of anxiety and promote relaxation.

Valerian root contains several compounds, including valerenic acid and valepotriates, that are thought to contribute to its anxiolytic effects. Valerian is often taken as a supplement in the form of capsules, tablets, or extracts.

It can also be consumed as a tea or tincture. The recommended dosage of valerian can vary depending on the individual and the form of the supplement, but generally, it is safe to take in recommended doses.

However, it is important to note that it should be used with caution in combination with other sedative medications and should be avoided during pregnancy or breastfeeding without consulting a healthcare professional.

Ginseng

Herbs for anxiety Ginseng

has some benefits that will enhance health as well as relaxation. Even if this cannot be used as a sedative similar to Valerian, this herb can be used in increasing the sense of well being of a person that will improve his mental performance.

Ginseng is a plant that has been used in traditional medicine for centuries. It is believed to have a variety of health benefits, including reducing stress and anxiety.

There are two main types of ginseng: Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng) and American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius).

Both types contain active compounds called ginsenosides, which are believed to be responsible for the herb’s health benefits. Asian ginseng is thought to have a stimulating effect on the body and mind, which can help to reduce feelings of stress and anxiety.

This is because it is believed to help regulate the levels of certain neurotransmitters in the brain, such as dopamine and serotonin, which play a role in regulating mood. On the other hand, American ginseng is thought to have a calming effect on the body and mind, which can help to reduce anxiety by reducing the levels of stress hormones.

Ginseng can be consumed in several forms, including capsules, tablets, teas, and extracts. The recommended dosage can vary depending on the individual and the form of the supplement, but generally, it is safe to take in recommended doses.

However, it is important to note that ginseng can interact with certain medications and should be used with caution in people with high blood pressure, diabetes, or other health conditions. It is also not recommended for pregnant or breastfeeding women without consulting a healthcare professional.

Chamomile

Herbs for anxiety Chamomile

is known to be utilized for plenty of years and will aid people who are suffering from several ailments. Apart from being used as a relaxant, Chamomile is recognized to be used for problems with digestion and relief from menstrual pain. There are five primary varieties of Chamomile such as German, Roman, Moroccan, Cape and wild Chamomile. The Chamomile tea is usually produced from German Chamomile.

Chamomile is a herb that has been traditionally used to promote relaxation and reduce anxiety. It is believed to work by increasing the levels of certain neurotransmitters in the brain, such as serotonin and GABA, which play a role in regulating mood.

There are two main types of chamomile used medicinally: German chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla) and Roman chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile). Both types contain compounds called flavonoids, which are believed to be responsible for the herb’s anxiolytic effects.

Chamomile can be consumed in several forms, including capsules, tablets, teas, and extracts. The recommended dosage can vary depending on the individual and the form of the supplement, but generally, it is safe to take in recommended doses.

Several studies have been conducted on the effects of chamomile on anxiety, and they have shown promising results. For example, a study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychology in 2008 found that taking a chamomile supplement for eight weeks led to a significant reduction in symptoms of anxiety in participants with generalized anxiety disorder.

Another study published in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine in 2009 found that taking a chamomile supplement for four weeks led to a significant reduction in symptoms of anxiety in participants with mild to moderate anxiety.

It is important to note that chamomile can interact with certain medications and should be used with caution in people with allergies to plants in the daisy family, and in pregnant or breastfeeding women without consulting a healthcare professional.

Lavenders

Herbs for anxiety Lavenders

can be found in lots of gardens and are used as balm which can be applied to the temples as well as help in headaches. This herb can be used as tea for anxiety in order to provide relaxation and sleep. Lavenders will become essential oil which is called Lavender oil once these are distilled. These were used in hospitals as well as in medical facilities as disinfectants during the World War I.

Lavender is an herb that has traditionally been used to promote relaxation and reduce anxiety. It is believed to work by affecting the levels of certain neurotransmitters in the brain, such as GABA, which play a role in regulating mood. The scent of lavender has been found to have a calming effect, which can help to reduce feelings of anxiety.

Lavender can be consumed in several forms, including essential oils, capsules, teas, and extracts. Inhalation of lavender oil is the most common method for reducing anxiety.

There have been several studies conducted on the effects of lavender on anxiety, and they have shown promising results. For example, a study published in the journal “Phytomedicine” in 2011 found that inhaling lavender essential oil for 15 minutes can significantly reduce symptoms of anxiety in participants with generalized anxiety disorder.(Source)

Another study published in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine in 2013 found that taking a lavender supplement for four weeks led to a significant reduction in symptoms of anxiety in participants with mild to moderate anxiety.

It is important to note that lavender essential oil should be used with caution and in recommended doses, as it can interact with certain medications and may cause skin irritation. It is also not recommended for use during pregnancy or breastfeeding without consulting a healthcare professional.

Damiana

Herbs for anxiety Damiana

Damiana (Turnera diffusa) is an herb that has traditionally been used to promote relaxation and reduce anxiety. It is believed to work by affecting the levels of certain neurotransmitters in the brain, such as serotonin, which play a role in regulating mood. Damiana is also known to have an effect on sexual function in both men and women and is sometimes used as an aphrodisiac.

Damiana can be consumed in several forms, including capsules, teas, and extracts.

There have been a limited number of studies conducted on the effects of Damiana on anxiety, and the results are mixed. A study published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology in 2008 found that Damiana extract had an anxiolytic effect on mice, but more human studies are needed to confirm its efficacy and safety as an anxiolytic.

It is important to note that Damiana can have some side effects and should be used with caution. It should not be used during pregnancy or breastfeeding without consulting a healthcare professional. Also, Damiana can interact with certain medications and it’s advisable to consult a healthcare professional before using it.

is primarily used for sexual concerns, but, it is also used for depression and in enhancing the mental capacity. The disadvantage of this herb is that it will result to insomnia, headache, hallucinations, mucous membrane irritation of the urethra and also liver injury. Pregnant women are not advised to use this herb for anxiety.
The herbs for anxiety are less harmful to people when compared to the prescribed drugs because they have fewer side effects. But, there will still be side effects which could be considered to be less pleasurable.  Nowadays,  more and more medical experts are looking into the primary herbal uses in treating anxiety.

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References :
https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/generalized-anxiety-disorder/expert-answers/herbal-treatment-for-anxiety/faq-20057945.
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/herbs-for-anxiety.
https://www.healthline.com/health/anxiety/herbs-for-anxiety.

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